Latest Health News

Three Classifications of Chronic Pain Sources Dictate Which Medications Will Work Best
23Jun, 2015

Prescription Drugs for Chronic Pain

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Pain is the activation of electrical activity in neurons which have sensory endings with a higher threshold for reaction.  This means that while surface receptors may register pain from heat or touch, deep nerves that sense pain will not register this occurrence throughout the body.  While any type of pain, acute or chronic, can become the source of massive discomfort, it should also be remembered that pain reactions are a defense mechanism. By being able to sense pain as an indicator that an action can be harmful to health, people […]
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27Jan, 2015

What is a Long Term Care Pharmacy?

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The ideals of a long term care pharmacy are actually re-exploring the initial role of an apothecary within communities.  Before the privatization of healthcare, most individuals relied heavily upon pharmacists as a form of primary care physician.  By visiting the local apothecary, individuals were able to receive both basic diagnosis and treatment for a variety of common ailments. Urgent care centers, emergency rooms, and specialty physicians have come to fill this role in modern times, with the pharmacy as an ancillary care provider for medications, either prescription or over the […]
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19Dec, 2014

Treating Red, Dry Skin Patches on Your Face

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The occurrence of red, dry patches on the face can be attributed to environmental factors as well as internal issues that show this symptomatic expression. The outside factors that can often exacerbate this condition include: Seasonal changes Cold weather Wind Dampness Excessive rubbing of the nose and cheeks This makes these patches more common in colder weather, and the remedies that are often employed are ones that can calm the inflammation on the skin and also offer preventive measure by creating a barrier between the skin and the elements. However, […]
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3Dec, 2014

The Risk Factors for Osteoporosis

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Although osteoporosis can result in a chronic lessening of the density of bones, it is also a preventable and treatable disease. Learning about the causes of the disease and the treatment options can allow many patients to find relief from the symptoms while actively making lifestyle changes that can halt the progression of the illness. What is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is essentially a condition in which the bones become porous and brittle. This can lead to larger health concerns such as fractures and breaks, as well as back and joint pains […]
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1Dec, 2014

Living with HIV

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Although the two diseases are associated with one another, HIV and AIDS are technically different illness stages that are linked. While people with AIDS have HIV, not all patients who are HIV positive progress to the stage of AIDS. HIV is a virus that attacks the T cells in the body, and thus causes a reaction that leads to a compromised immune system. AIDS is the outcome of when HIV has progressed to the point that the immune system can no longer fight off any illness. This means that the […]
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21Nov, 2014

What is a Specialty Pharmacy?

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Although a number of specialty pharmacies exist as stand-alone treatment providers, the rise of chronic and complex conditions has also led to specialty pharmacies that may operate out of a traditional pharmacy setting. The brief definition is that these providers are trained and certified to handle specialty pharmaceuticals, which can include chemotherapy drugs. What are Specialty Pharmaceuticals? The specialty pharmaceuticals definition is any class of drug that often has a complex process for manufacturing or administering. These will often include biological or bio-pharmaceutical drugs, but can also include synthesized compounds […]
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21Aug, 2014

Oncology Hospitalists: An Emerging and Growing Specialty

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As a medical specialty, the number of hospitalists, along with the number of institutions using hospitalists, has grown rapidly since the mid-1990s. There were about 11,000 hospitalists working in the United States in 2003, according to a Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) estimate, and about 35,000 in 2012. Traditionally, hospitalists have been physicians trained in internal medicine who provide care to hospitalized patients. But hospitalist programs have expanded beyond being the “generalist,” and have moved into specialties such as neurology, orthopedic surgery, pediatrics, general surgery, and oncology. Although not yet […]
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